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#26 2008-11-09 22:05:56

punxnotdead
Member
From: Canada...eh?
Registered: 2006-05-09
Posts: 11300

Re: Aspiring Writers

Good idea, Layira!! And Welcome to the Cafe...finally!!! smile


I'm an aspiring bodybuilder! smile
"Be yourself to be free." - The Unseen
I <3 SMALLVILLE!!!

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#27 2008-11-16 01:13:54

Randomwolf42
Random Wolf [Moderator]
From: Canada, eh?
Registered: 2007-11-22
Posts: 5397
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

If you get writers' block, take a break from the story and write something else. Also, don't lock yourself into one particular plot, keep it adaptable. And don't be bothered by your inner critic, write the kind of story you'd like to read, not what you think others would like. Get a second or third opinion, the more the better, but don't let yourself be put down by criticism, its just that person's opinion and no matter what you write, someone or other will probably not like it.

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#28 2008-11-24 11:14:01

Niktoma
Advocatus Diaboli
Registered: 2007-07-20
Posts: 1077
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

I think another important step in writing is reading.  You can't be an effective writer if you're not an effective reader, reading is the other half of the equation.

Reading teaches you, almost subconsciously, how words go together, how sentences are formed, and even spelling and grammar.  It's a powerful tool, and one I feel isn't utilized as often as it should be.


'OK, how about werewolves?' said the voice eventually.
'What do they look like?' asked the kid.
'Ah, well, they look perfectly normal right up to the point where they grow all, like, hair and teeth and giant paws and leap through the window at you,' said the voice.

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#29 2009-02-03 17:49:58

werer
Sniffer
From: Australia!
Registered: 2008-04-13
Posts: 873
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

I find the best way to go around writer's block is to do something that you wouldn't normally do while thinking of the ideas. I go for a walk, sometimes a jog, juggle, balance something, do exercise, sing, play guitar, slap a crazy tune, clean something, pull funny faces in front of my mirror. Anything that's not directly related to writing.

I also do thinking relative to the situation I'm in. I think 'what would my character do in this situation?' So I'm on a bus, it's raining outside, and I fogging up the window, I'd wonder what my character would do if he was outside. Sometimes, I think of an interesting situation, and plot and plan as how they would come to that and how it would fit in the story. Not everything works, but it gives me plenty of ideas ^_^ and also helps to create realism. For example, my character wouldn't go hang out in a pub, if he was dragged there, he'd leave pretty quickly. To top that off I might have it that he was being spied on by some bad guy. He has now left company, and is alone. Bad guys can now jump him, what would he do then?

Just some ideas to think about. smile


There's a method to my madness, and a madness to my method.
When you feel your skin startin' to itch, and your senses start to reel, it's werewolf time!
*Sniff sniff* I smell art! big_smile

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#30 2009-03-04 13:45:29

Grayle
Literary Lycanthrope
From: My Desk. Duh.
Registered: 2007-09-04
Posts: 2006
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

Shameless bump.

Grayle wrote:

As you continue your posts, just a few friendly words of advice:

    1. We encourage any writer that posts to read other stories on here as well. We're all here to get feedback, so it's only fair that if you wish feedback on your story, try to give some out as well. Also, other stories can give you ideas on improving vocabulary, sentence/paragraph structure, or maybe even ideas on where to continue your story (Just be careful with that last one - no plagiarisms allowed around here!).

    2. Longer posts tend to be intimidating to many readers. Try to keep your segments equivalent to around one page or so using Microsoft Word - depending on the circumstances, of course. You can figure it to be around 700 words, give or take. For many of our visitours, it proves to be less daunting to read shorter posts than lengthy ones, increasing your odds for feedback.

    3. Use multiple paragraphs and indentations when you can, not just one huge block of text. It's easier to follow and keep track. Skip a line between paragraphs, and skip two or three lines for time lapses or segment separations. If you prefer, try to indent your paragraphs with 2 spaces or so.

    4. Ask, Ask, Ask. If you have any questions, ask. If you want feedback from a specific writer, ask him/her. You can ask them on their Personal Forums, or you can contact a specific writer with a PM, email, or even in one of their story topics if they don't mind.

    5. There are a whole lot of stories being updated regularly here in the Stories area, and it's difficult to keep up with all of them. This makes requesting feedback from specific writers even more important, as they may have missed your post or are falling behind.

    6. As a request from many of our regulars, please try to use proper grammar and spelling. It can be essential in order for others to read your story coherently and with minimal confusion. Try to write your stories as you like to read them. Most word processors will give helpful hints and spell-checkers, and even Web browsers like Firefox will point out questionable spellings before you finalize your post.

    7. If you aren't getting the replies you want, keep going with your writing anyway. Don't worry if you're not getting expected replies on your recent posts - if the number of views is increasing, it's very likely you are being noticed. People lead busy lives and they often don't have the time to make regular replies. However, if you find yourself missing feedback from a certain regular or fellow writer, see suggestions 4 and 5 above for helpful tips in this regard and contact them.


      Nose to the Wind, Everybody!


To thy known wolf be true...


"Yay! We're Doomed!"  -- Gir

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#31 2009-03-13 10:35:09

Kate94
New member
Registered: 2009-02-26
Posts: 9

Re: Aspiring Writers

When I get writers block I resort to music (For each of my books I have a musical playlist - I know it sounds weird but it does work!) You can just over come writers block over something simple like a walk or watcing something - as long as you're inspired smile

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#32 2009-06-21 03:10:14

Grey_Tsume
Member
Registered: 2007-05-01
Posts: 201

Re: Aspiring Writers

And another thing is to make sure you stay alive on the forums when writing! heh heh...I doubt if anyone remembers me but i'm back sorta. I've missed this place for a while...i have soooo much more reading to do. heh XD


Pain is good....it lets you know your alive.
Boredom is an ugly thing.

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#33 2009-10-20 18:33:21

Grayle
Literary Lycanthrope
From: My Desk. Duh.
Registered: 2007-09-04
Posts: 2006
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

Quick Note:

    I am looking to improve my critique capabilities. If you are interested in receiving a proofreading critique or feedback on story, grammar, sentence/paragraph structure, pace, flow, or any combination of the above, I offer my services free.
    Just let me know via email, or leave me a message on my Personal Forum.


To thy known wolf be true...


"Yay! We're Doomed!"  -- Gir

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#34 2009-11-21 16:31:26

SilentStrider
Member
From: Michigan, Oscoda
Registered: 2008-09-10
Posts: 432

Re: Aspiring Writers

One of the things I like to do to help me feel inspired to write is listening to music.  The tune and lyrics can really help me to get into the mood and also help me to see and feel the scene that I want to write about.  The mood and atmosphere can make a story come alive for the reader. 

Another thing that I find extremely helpful is to make an outline.  My mind writes way faster than my fingers can type and often the two get so far out of sync.  So if I'm still working on typing out my first chapter and I find my thoughts already on chapter two, three and four then I switch the way I'm writing into more of an outline format.  I type it out in brief descriptions of environment and actions, but I still type out dialogue.

Sometimes I find myself thinking about a particular scene involving my characters and I think, "Oh, wow! wouldn't that be cool," but I don't know where in the story it will go yet.  This is where I find keeping a time line helps.  I turn a page sideways, draw a line horizontally right across the middle and then write down inside boxes brief descriptions of the scenes I want to write about.  The boxes go above and below the line and then I'll draw arrows from the boxes to the time line to help me figure out the order of things.  This is also a great tool to help you figure out what you may need to write to connect scene A to scene B, or help you eliminate scenes that don't fit.

Last edited by SilentStrider (2009-11-22 08:05:22)

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#35 2009-12-16 16:46:29

HarvestLeafEntertainment
Member
From: Harvest City
Registered: 2009-04-27
Posts: 103
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

SilentStrider wrote:

One of the things I like to do to help me feel inspired to write is listening to music.  The tune and lyrics can really help me to get into the mood and also help me to see and feel the scene that I want to write about.  The mood and atmosphere can make a story come alive for the reader. 

Another thing that I find extremely helpful is to make an outline.  My mind writes way faster than my fingers can type and often the two get so far out of sync.  So if I'm still working on typing out my first chapter and I find my thoughts already on chapter two, three and four then I switch the way I'm writing into more of an outline format.  I type it out in brief descriptions of environment and actions, but I still type out dialogue.

Sometimes I find myself thinking about a particular scene involving my characters and I think, "Oh, wow! wouldn't that be cool," but I don't know where in the story it will go yet.  This is where I find keeping a time line helps.  I turn a page sideways, draw a line horizontally right across the middle and then write down inside boxes brief descriptions of the scenes I want to write about.  The boxes go above and below the line and then I'll draw arrows from the boxes to the time line to help me figure out the order of things.  This is also a great tool to help you figure out what you may need to write to connect scene A to scene B, or help you eliminate scenes that don't fit.

a lot of writers do this. I listen to classical music. The outline thing is spot on b/c I'll get the dialogue in my head seconds after I've plotted a storyline and so I'll write at the top the outline (can resemble a timeline) and then try to get as much script as done before it goes out of my head. So fascinating how similar book/comic book writing is to songwritign or scriptwriting.


"In Harvest City, monsters roam the streets at night. Werewolves, vampires, zombies... when the police can't handle the creatures that bump in the night, they call the P.F.A.™" (Check out our book/comics forum on here for our major updates)

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#36 2010-01-13 02:37:43

SilentStrider
Member
From: Michigan, Oscoda
Registered: 2008-09-10
Posts: 432

Re: Aspiring Writers

I have recently run into some writers block dealing with describing faces, and exactly how much character description is a good amount vs too much.  I did some research and thought that this link might help others who may stumble onto the same problems as I have.  http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/sho … hp?t=42132

Last edited by SilentStrider (2010-01-13 02:38:22)

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#37 2010-02-05 05:21:35

SilentStrider
Member
From: Michigan, Oscoda
Registered: 2008-09-10
Posts: 432

Re: Aspiring Writers

I went to my third meeting with the the writer's critique group I've recently joined and I picked up some useful information that I thought I might share with everyone else here. 

If you're an aspiring writer hoping one day to actually get something published I would highly recommend checking out a book called "The Writer's Market." It contains extremely valuable information regarding how to format your work so any potential publisher will be more inclined to actually pick up your material and read it.  But, perhaps the most useful information the book offers is an enormous list of publishers through out the world.  It even has helpful information regarding specific publishers and what they look for.  The book gets reprinted every year, and keeps its information updated.  It's probably the most useful tool out there for when you're ready to expose yourself and get your stuff to print smile

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#38 2010-02-24 07:35:23

Dira
Nightwalker werewolf illustrator
From: SA
Registered: 2007-10-22
Posts: 844

Re: Aspiring Writers

Ok I've gotten some usefull information when I was researching in the library the otherday. Don't let characters feel the whole through the book sorry about themself. Give life to stories' words. Give each character motivation to keep on living in the story, just to see if you want to carry on writing the story. Give characters in the book a purpose. No dark stories after the next, not everyword should use jargon it bores people to death sometimes you might just sound pompous or clishes. Clishes aren't seen as discriptive. Clishe is snow white, lilly white, it's not so catchy anymore. Some books or cartoons get comedy into it by using jargon. Start your story with one sentance that will grab the reader. Like "The gloomy morning in the marshes didn't stop him from going into the graveyard."

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#39 2010-05-19 16:25:38

fearless freak
Member
From: wakefield, west yorkshire
Registered: 2009-04-15
Posts: 818

Re: Aspiring Writers

okay i usualy act out the scenes literaly act them out, i used to do a bit of larping a few years back the full on contact stuff not the stuff where people shout "magic missile" or "fireball" and i got back in touch with them to ask for help for The Wolf Men for the fighting stuff


if you're gonna be dumb, you gotta be tough

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#40 2010-08-05 00:23:18

HarvestLeafEntertainment
Member
From: Harvest City
Registered: 2009-04-27
Posts: 103
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

fearless freak wrote:

okay i usualy act out the scenes literaly act them out, i used to do a bit of larping a few years back the full on contact stuff not the stuff where people shout "magic missile" or "fireball" and i got back in touch with them to ask for help for The Wolf Men for the fighting stuff

I'll act my stories out in my head, like watching a movie in my head. It's pretty cool.


"In Harvest City, monsters roam the streets at night. Werewolves, vampires, zombies... when the police can't handle the creatures that bump in the night, they call the P.F.A.™" (Check out our book/comics forum on here for our major updates)

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#41 2010-11-24 18:14:19

Warchildsilver
Member
Registered: 2010-11-10
Posts: 24

Re: Aspiring Writers

I found a wonderful website the other day that has a series of articles on professional writing.  It covers a host of different topics and is really easy to read and navigate through and I've found it has given me a large amount of insight into the industry as a whole.

http://www.louisaburton.com/fictioncraft.html

Last edited by Warchildsilver (2010-11-24 18:15:11)


*They were always here.  I just unlocked the door.*

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#42 2010-12-25 00:59:55

SilentStrider
Member
From: Michigan, Oscoda
Registered: 2008-09-10
Posts: 432

Re: Aspiring Writers

I just want to say, Warchild, the link you've provided has been very informative and inspirational to me, and on behalf of everyone else who has taken the time to check it out, thank you.  I have already read through all of Mrs. Burton's advice on how to write a story worthy of publishing, and I've read several of the postings more than once.  I'll probably keep referring to them in the future when I lose my way and need to regain my focus.

I strongly suggest (if you haven't already) that all the other writers of this forum who truly want to write better and are passionate about their work, to check out the above link.  It's worth it, even if you are already familiar with most of what the author has to say.  I'm sure even the most experienced writer can come away learning something new or gaining a new perspective on the old.

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#43 2011-03-28 12:39:10

Niktoma
Advocatus Diaboli
Registered: 2007-07-20
Posts: 1077
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

I found this link and it made me laugh.

I think it quite adequately presents the importance of grammar in writing.


'OK, how about werewolves?' said the voice eventually.
'What do they look like?' asked the kid.
'Ah, well, they look perfectly normal right up to the point where they grow all, like, hair and teeth and giant paws and leap through the window at you,' said the voice.

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#44 2011-05-31 18:05:42

Kyo the Nothing
New member
From: Hellsgate
Registered: 2011-05-27
Posts: 5
Website

Re: Aspiring Writers

i can only write on here soo-
the night air was thick around my face as i stood there looking up into the full moons face. i never wanted to look away again. my eyes got heavy as i fell into a deep sleep the tears from the earlier sorrow still on my face. sad i don't think i'm very good.


When your at Death's door, ring the doorbell and run he hates that.

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